Rotherham Mayor Councillor Lyndsay Pitchley and her Consort Mr. Alex Armitage’s term of office started in May 2016

Lifelong Rotherham resident Cllr Lyndsay Pitchley is “immensely proud and excited” to be representing the borough as its first citizen for the coming year. Sworn in to office just two days after her 40th birthday, Lyndsay has become Rotherham’s youngest ever Mayor – and she is full of energy and enthusiasm for her role representing a town she loves. “It’s the sense of community that I love about Rotherham, and the warmth and humour which you come across wherever you go,” said Lyndsay. I have lived here all my life, and love bringing our two children up here. I’m just so proud to be able to fulfil this role and am so excited to get out and about to meet people across the borough.”

The charities the Mayor is supporting are:

Alzheimer’s Society – Dementia can happen to anyone and there’s currently no cure. There are 850,000 people with dementia in the UK and the number is set to rise to 1 million by 2021. At Alzheimer’s Society, they believe that life doesn’t end when dementia begins. They are there for anyone affected by  ementia, and aim to keep people with dementia connected to their lives and the people who matter most. For more information about the charity, and what support is available locally, visit the website at www.alzheimers.org.uk

The National Autistic Society (Rotherham Branch) – is run on a voluntary basis by parents, carers and adults with autism spectrum conditions. The charity holds monthly peer support meetings, and provides a number of activities for both families and adults with autism. Volunteers raise awareness of autism, and support and encourage the development of autism services in Rotherham. Income to provide social activities and resources are raised by local parents and private donations. For more information about the charity, and what support is available locally, visit the website at www.nasbranch.org.uk/rotherham

Guide Dogs for the Blind – Visual impairment is a fact of life for thousands of people, and with an ageing population many more will be affected by sight loss in the future. Guide Dogs for the Blind provide mobility and freedom to blind and partially-sighted people. The charity also campaigns alongside visually-impaired people for rights that most sighted people take for granted. These include access to services and transport, freedom of mobility, and provision of better rehabilitation services. For more information about the charity, and what support is available locally, visit the website at www.guidedogs.org.uk